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Educators: Join Research Cruise to South Pacific Gyre

The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program invites educators to apply to sail on the JOIDES Resolution to serve as the onboard Education Officer during Expedition 329: South Pacific Gyre, October 8- December 12. This expedition will, among other goals, document the habitats, activities, composition and biomass of microbial communities in subseafloor sediments. Deep Earth Academy (IODP’s education program) invites interested educators at all levels (elementary – college) and informal science specialists to apply to be a part of this exciting scientific endeavor. The selected education officer will be responsible for sharing the science story with the outside world, including students, educators, and the general public. He/she will coordinate educational activities on board, such as blogging, maintaining social networking sites and facilitating live video conferences to classrooms, museums and special events on shore.  Applications

Fall 2010 Semester at Sea

Sea Education Association is currently accepting applications for their Fall 2010 programs, with a choice of themes:  The History & Practice of Pacific Ocean Science or Marine Resource Management in the Atlantic.  SEA is offering a 20% discount to select students who submit a complete application to the Ocean Exploration program before March 1, as well as a variety of merit scholarships and substantial need-based aid packages.  Contact admission@sea.edu for more information or to request the new SEA Semester catalogue.

Expedition to the North Atlantic – Join Online

On January 27 the Algalita Marine Research Foundation research team will embark on a voyage to study plastic pollution in the North Atlantic Ocean.  Students and teachers can join the research expedition from the classroom or home through the internet-based Ship-2-Shore Education Program, finding updates, images and videos from the research vessel through the program blog; opportunities to interact with the ship’s research team and other leading researchers to ask questions and share experiences; lessons and activities to integrate the experience into the classroom curriculum; and a chance to interact with students from around the world to share information, perspectives and solutions to this global issue.  For more information contact Holly Gray (vesselsupport@algalita.org) or visit the Ship-2-Shore website.

Join a Voyage to Study Marine Ecosystems – Online

Join Oceanographic Research Vessel Alguita for a voyage studying plastic pollution in the North Pacific Ocean. This September the Algalita Marine Research Foundation research team set sail to one of the most remote regions of the Pacific Ocean to study human impacts on marine ecosystems.The voyage started on September 7th, but it is not too late to get involved! We invite students and teachers to join this voyage from the classroom or from home on the Internet by providing:
• Daily updates and images from the research vessel
• The opportunity to interact with the ship’s research team and other leading researchers to ask questions and share experiences
• Lessons, activities and creative ways to integrate the experience into the classroom curriculum
• A chance to interact with students from around the world to share information, perspectives and solutions to this global issue
For more information contact Holly Gray- vesselsupport@algalita.org or visit http://algalita.org/ship-2-shore-education.html

Eye in the Sea Mystery

Mystery Question from scientist Dr. Erika Raymond, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
On the morning of Tuesday, July 21, the Ocean Research & Conservation Association’s Eye in the Sea (EITS) was placed at a depth of 2,000 feet, with a bait box to attract marine life, and its cameras set to record for one minute, every five minutes. For this deployment, the EITS would remain in place for several days capturing the marine life going about their everyday business. That afternoon, the Johnson Sea Link descended again with other scientists and they noticed that the EITS was on its side and had been dragged for about 20 meters. Nearby, they spotted something and picked it up. It was a tangled mess of fishing line with a large rusty hook and an illuminating lure – still flashing. Also swimming suspiciously nearby was a six-gill shark, a slow-moving very large, deep-sea shark that ambles along the ocean floor. The pilot righted the EITS and they went back to the business at hand.

Project scientists were puzzled by the mystery of what caused the EITS to be knocked down and dragged away and what did this hook and line have to do with it? Did a fisherman catch the EITS on its hook? Did that six-gill knock it down trying to get to the EITS bait box? Were the predatory pack of Cuban dogfish to blame?

What do you think happened? Submit your guess through our Ask an Explorer link. Your responses will be published on the Ocean Explorer website.  The amazing footage that the EITS captured that solved the mystery will be revealed Thursday July 30.

Researchers Looking For New Forms of Marine Life, Clues to Deep-Sea Communities

A team of researchers, led by NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center, is surveying an underwater mountain chain in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean to study its biodiversity. The international research team is working aboard the 208-foot NOAA ship Henry B. Bigelow as part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge Ecosystem Project, or MAR-ECO. This project is one of 14 field programs that are part of the Census of Marine Life, a 10-year global study of the abundance, distribution and diversity of marine life in the world’s oceans. The Census began in 2000 and seeks, by 2010, to determine what lives in the ocean and how this life has changed with time. More information about the expedition is available online.

Join Researchers Online on a Cruise to Study Plastic Debris in the Pacific

Join Oceanographic Research Vessel Alguita for a voyage to the North Pacific Gyre to study plastic marine debris. This summer the research team will sail to one of the most remote regions of the ocean to study human impacts on marine ecosystems.  Students and teachers are invited to join this voyage online and receive:

• Daily updates and images from the research vessel
• The opportunity to interact with the ship’s research team and other leading researchers to ask questions and share experiences
• Lessons, activities and creative ways to integrate the experience into the classroom curriculum
• A chance to interact with students from around the world to share information, perspectives and solutions to this global issue

Learn more